Life of Bria

Symington, Sabrina. 2015-Ongoing. Life of Bria [Webcomic]. https://lifeofbria.com

Life of Bria banner image, with a bustling group of her comic characters, including dinosaurs, ninjas, and Bria herself with trademark feather earring and bicycle gloves.

Life of Bria starts with a surreal four-panel gag featuring Watchmen antihero Rorschach washing his hands with a bar of soap. The last panel has ominous text reading “Who Washes the Washers.” Understanding the pun requires specific popular culture knowledge; finding it funny requires a somewhat odd sense of humor. The in-joke quality and Bronze Age visual flair establish the tone of this webcomic series. Continue reading

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None of the Above

Gregorio, I.W. 2015. None of the Above. New York: Balzer + Bray.

Cover of book with large title text on a white background. Out of the three O's, one is colored in blue and crossed out, one is colored in pink and crossed out, and the last is colored in purple.

Kristin just turned 18 and her life is going pretty great so far. She has two wonderful best friends and a gorgeous and loving boyfriend, does well in school and athletics, and was just crowned Homecoming Queen. After the dance, she and her boyfriend decide to “go all the way” for the first time because they love each other and they’re ready.

But something goes wrong. Continue reading

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Looking

Lannan, Michael (Creator). 2014-2016. Looking [television series]. New York: HBO Entertainment.

The title text, Looking, in bright blue outlined letters.

In this comedy-drama television series, three gay friends in San Francisco navigate dating, friendship, and work. Jonathan Groff plays Patrick, a 29-year-old video game designer who has never had a long-term boyfriend. Frankie J. Alvarez plays Agustín, a 31-year-old artist who is cohabitating with his boyfriend. Murray Bartlett plays Dom, a 39-year old waiter who is more interested in hookups than dating. Continue reading

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Donovan’s Big Day

Newman, Lesléa (Author) and Dutton, Mike (Illustrator). (2011). Donovan’s Big Day. New York, NY: Tricycle Press.

Book cover with young child wearing a suit and red bowtie, smiling and looking slightly to the right.

From the author of Heather Has Two Mommies comes another heartwarming picture book about a queer family just doing regular family things.  Through delightful prose and lovely illustrations, Donovan’s Big Day describes a very full day of preparation before the wedding ceremony of Donovan’s mothers, where he has the very important job of carefully giving them their rings. Continue reading

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Under the Udala Trees

Okparanta, Chinelo. 2015. Under the Udala Trees. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

The book cover, with title in large text across the middle of an orange sky, framed by green trees.

With lyrical prose richly adorned with Igbo proverbs and folklore motifs, Okparanta weaves a poignant coming of age story of a Nigerian girl growing up in a war zone. Continue reading

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More Happy Than Not

Silvera, Adam. 2015. More Happy Than Not. New York: Soho Teen.

Book cover with blue title and yellow background.

A new memory-relief institute has opened in the Bronx, and trauma victims, grieving parents, and schizophrenics are finally able to achieve respite from troubling memories. Aaron Soto is skeptical of a miracle treatment center serving the projects, but he has seen the procedure work for a friend. Even so, it doesn’t seem like a great idea. Aaron’s had some challenges in his life, but he wouldn’t want to erase his memories. Continue reading

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Willful Machines

Floreen, Tim. 2015. Willful Machines. New York: Simon Pulse.

Book cover with raven in flight and title text.

In the near future, robotics is a typical high school class, scientists have created sentient AI, and gay kids still have to worry about conservative politics. Lee Fisher, robotics geek and son of the U.S. President, is deeply closeted and terrified of what his father might think. Continue reading

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