Zinester Spotlight: Tobi Hill-Meyer

Tobi Hill-Meyer is an activist, theorist, consultant, and all-around creative type. She is an indigenous Chicana trans woman who makes zines and films as well as produces academic writing. My community archives, McNabb Archives, just acquired several of her zines thanks to colleague and friend Jane Sandberg.

One half-size zine and six quarter-size zines. Continue reading

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Extreme Meatpunks Forever

Flowers, Heather (Creator). Extreme Meatpunks Forever. Downloadable serial game. https://hthr.itch.io/extreme-meatpunks-forever

A robot made of meat and bones reclining on a cliff.

“A serial visual novel/mech brawler about four gay disasters beating up neonazis in giant robots made of meat. Get ready for the worst road trip of all time.”

From the utterly charming ASCII backgrounds to the unapologetic queerness throughout, I loved it all. Continue reading

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The Art of Being Normal

Williamson, Lisa. The Art of Being Normal. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers, 2016.

A pink figure in a dress stepping out of a blue figure in pants.

Kate Piper is a mostly-closeted trans girl who is bullied mercilessly by school peers for being a “freak.” Her parents and peers think she’s a gay boy. Kate has two close friends who do know her secret and accept her fully. Continue reading

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Anna Anthropy

Videogame Developer: Anna Anthropy. Interactive Fiction Database. itch.io.

A Witch wearing glasses and a crystal necklace, looking in a glass ball.

Anna Anthropy, also known as Auntie Pixelante, is a prolific game designer who imparts a distinctly queer flavor to her mostly 8-bit creations. She is probably most famous for designing Dys4ia (2012), an autobiographical game that explores gender dysphoria and hormone replacement therapy. Continue reading

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Stella Brings the Family

Schiffer, Miriam B. (Author) and Holly Clifton-Brown (Illustrator). Stella Brings the Family. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2015.

A red-haired little girl between her two dads. Everyone is smiling and holding hands.

In this charming picture book, Stella’s teacher asks everyone to invite a special guest for a Mother’s Day party at school. Stella is concerned because she doesn’t have a mother to bring. Continue reading

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Bleeding Thunder

Grace, Fēnix, and Silen Wellington (Co-Editors). Bleeding Thunder: A Zine Exploring Genderqueer Menstruation. February 2020.

Open legs with a moon, fungi, and a snake.

This compilation zine collects poetry, essays, and visual art by transgender/nonbinary creatives about menstruation experiences, biological essentialism, and gender dysphoria and euphoria. Continue reading

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Pet

Emezi, Akwaeke. Pet. New York: Make Me a World, 2019.

A young Black woman holding a white feather in front of a purple landscape of streets and homes.

Jam and her best friend Redemption live in the idyllic town of Lucille, where monsters were banished by the angels many years ago. They live a wonderful life with their loving families, who include a few angels. Continue reading

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Wait, What? A Comic Book Guide to Relationships, Bodies, and Growing Up

Corinna, Heather (Writer), Isabella Rotman (Illustrator), and Luke B. Howard (Colorist). What, What? A Comic Book Guide to Relationships, Bodies, and Growing Up. Portland, OR: Limerence Press, 2019.

Five multiracial preteens sitting at a lunch table. One is scratching their head, asking "Wait, what?"

In this succinct yet comprehensive nonfiction graphic novel, Scarleteen geniuses Heather Corinna and Isabella Rotman bring sexuality education to preteens and teens. Covering relationships, bodies, and puberty, Wait, What? is highly inclusive in terms of gender identity, sexual orientation, relationship style, and ethnicity. It is also accessible in terms of clear text, plenty of white space, and engaging comic illustrations. Continue reading

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The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali

Khan, Sabina. The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali. New York: Scholastic Press, 2019.

Light blue book cover with a Bengali girl wearing black in profile.

Seventeen-year-old Rukhsana is a budding mathematician and physicist preparing to go to Caltech on a full ride scholarship. She lives with her conservative Muslim parents and must keep her sexual orientation a secret to avoid family friction. Her girlfriend Ariana is out and proud and sometimes quite upset about being a secret. But Rukhsana pacifies her, saying that once they are in California in college together, they can be more open. Continue reading

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Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl

Lawlor, Andrea. Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl. Rescue Press, 2017.

A pale pink book cover with a young androgynous face with parted lips.

Paul/Polly is a queer shapeshifter, morphing from riot grrl punk to beach boy as he desires. In a university town in the 1990s, 22-year-old Paul/Polly tends bar at the only gay club. The town is bursting with a rich political scene. Paul/Polly goes to Queer Nation and ACT UP meetings during the day and then parties at night, enjoying sexual escapades with people of all genders, AS people of all genders. Continue reading

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